Summer Wonder Poetry

Oct 1, 2018

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Carol Varsalona

Have you ever experienced the feeling of sparks flying in your brain? I have. Today, I am in the creative zone, am energized, and eager to notice, wonder, and write but I am faced with a dilemma.

Tonight, #WonderChat is discussing the topic, "Wonder Poetry" but it is at the same time as #NYEDChat. Since I am moderating #NYEDChat, I paused to reflect on how to balance both platforms with only a short period of time to prepare. The wheels started turning...

I usually schedule my answers when faced with a situation like this so I started looking over the question document for #WonderChat that is being moderated by one of my fellow Wonder Lead Ambassadors, Leticia Citizen. When I came to Q6, I thought, "Here is a poetic challenge."

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I knew I wrote a blog post using Wonder of the Day, #285, When Are the Dog Days of Summer?, so I accessed that blog, Dog Day Afternoon and was pleasantly surprised that I created a sun-kissed summer image/text. Then, I searched my digitized nature photos taken this summer and found one that would be a great composition for an image poem (you can see that image at the beginning of the blog). I needed to reread "When Are the Dog Days of Summer?" to create a poem using the blackout poem format. But before I started composing, I went to my Wonder Ground site and found the lesson I created for WOD #285. With the big idea already formulated, I proceeded.

Essential Question: How does nature inspire us as readers, writers, and artists?

Curriculum Guiding Question: How does the unpacking of a popular expression allow for deeper meaning?

(My pathway to writing a new poem really was based on the above questions, while thinking about the last question of WOD #285.)

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The next step was more time-consuming. I had to synthesize what I read to capture words from the WOD that would become a wonder poem.

After much deliberation, I created a wonder poem based on the concept of the dog days of summer. I had previously digitized the original photo, turning the photo into digital art with a free digital tool. Then, I drafted my poem. The end result was an image poem, an example of #digipoetry. Could I revise the poem? Certainly, but for now it will stay as is. I am now open for both glow statements and grow statements.

I mention the process I engaged in because it is important to note that writers are at various stages of development. Reflection is a key step to creating additional poems or revising existing ones. Teachers are the guides on the journey of helping students become lifelong writers.

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For now, I feel a sense of relief as I am almost ready for both chats tonight.

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