Dog Days of Summer

53 min.

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Wonder of the Day #285

When Are the Dog Days Of Summer?

Grade Standards Subjects Topics
K RI.K.8. ELA Reading Standards for Informational Text
K RF.K.4. ELA Foundational Skills
K RI.K.4. ELA Reading Standards for Informational Text
K RI.K.2. ELA Reading Standards for Informational Text
K K.8 (A) Science Science, Kindergarten.
K RI.K.1. ELA Reading Standards for Informational Text
K SL.K.2. ELA Speaking and Listening Standards
K L.K.5.c. ELA Language Standards
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Objective

Students, as visual artists, will create a visual board of a "dog day" afternoon to show their understanding of the popular expression used to describe a summer day.

Big Idea

Essential Question:

How does nature inspire us as readers, writers, and artists?

Curriculum Guiding Question:

How does the unpacking of a popular expression allow for deeper meaning?



Students will:

Watch the video found at WOD #285, "When Are the Dog Days of Summer?"

Listen to the teacher read aloud the introduction to the WOD.

"Whew! It's hot in Wonderopolis today. In fact, it feels like the dog days of summer have arrived. But what exactly does that mean?

Turn and Talk: Discuss your thoughts on what the dog days of summer are.

Sketch and Talk: Draw what a "dog day" of summer might look like. Share this with your partner. How are your thoughts similar? How are they different?


Students will:

Listen to WOD #285 as they read the passage together.

Look at a series of images of a "dog day" afternoon at: http://beyondliteracylink.blogspot.com/2017/08/dog...

Partner Creation Time: Create a shared vision board of sketches, photos, or images of a "dog day" afternoon. Together write one descriptive sentence of a "dog day" afternoon.

Engage in a Snowball Protocol where pairs will partner with another pair to share their images and descriptions of a "dog day" afternoon.

Display their series of images with their descriptions on a gallery wall, "The Dog Days of Summer".

Think-Ink-Share: Individually, students will write a brief reflection on what a "dog day" afternoon is. Students will share their individual reflections with their quad.

Quad Discussion: Each quad will discuss two questions: 1. Has your understanding of the "dog days" of summer changed because of reading, writing, and speaking activities? 2. How does nature inspire us as readers, writers, and artists?

Final Thoughts: Each quad will share their responses to the two quad thought questions with the class.