How to Conquer Stage Fright

50 min.

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Grade Standards Subjects Topics
12th W.11-12.7 ELA Writing Standards
12th W.11-12.5 ELA Writing Standards
12th W.11-12.4 ELA Writing Standards
12th W.11-12.2 ELA Writing Standards

Objective

Students will employ process writing skills to create a how-to guide for their peers about how to conquer stage fright.

Big Idea

As the school year ends, there are countless awards ceremonies, final presentations, graduations, and formal recognition for students and teachers. Inevitably, students will be called upon to speak in front of others and this can cause major anxiety. In this lesson, students will research stage fright and create guides for others on how this common fear can be conquered.

To begin, students will watch a Stage Fright Short (cartoon short) on stage fright and answer the following questions in their Writer's Notebooks:

  • Have you ever had stage fright?
  • What are the symptoms of performance anxiety?
  • How can you conquer stage fright?

Once students have had five minutes to write/respond silently, they should speak to at least one elbow partner (a peer closest to them) about what they wrote and be prepared to share with the whole group. Allow time for students to share aloud.

To begin, students will use annotation techniques to research stage fright and possible techniques for overcoming it. Students should look for the main idea(s) of each source, the important new information about stage fright, and any tips for overcoming it. All sources should be cited properly.

Allow students to use technology to review the Wonder of the Day as a starting point, and to find one source on their own. Here are some samples of possible sources to print and share with students if technology is not readily available:

Explain to students that the end game here is to create a how-to guide for other students who might be giving final presentations or formal speeches for the end of the school year.

Once students have researched and recorded their findings in their notes, distribute the assignment guide. Students will then draft their how-to guides and submit for review/feedback from one peer and the teacher. Final drafts can be completed in subsequent lessons or for homework once feedback has been provided.